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Gc 974.4 St29c 1901-02 
State Normal. School, at 

Hyannis (Mass. ) 
Catalog and circular for 



STATE NORMAL 
SCHOOL 




HYANNIS 



MASSACHUSETTS 




CATALOGUE AND CIRCULAR 
** & J90J-J902 ^ <* 



STATE 



NORMAL SCHOOL 



HYANNIS, MASS. 



CATALOGUE AND CIRCULAR 
For 1901-1902. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

1 8 Post Office Square. 

1901. 



Alton County Public Library 
900 Webster Street 

FSrt%M. IN 46801-2270 



State Board of Education, 190K 



EX OFFICIO. 
His Excellency W. MURRAY CRANE, Governor. 
His Honor JOHN L. BATES, Lieutenant-Governor. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

Term expires. 

GEORGE H. CONLEY, A.M., Boston, . May 25, 1901. 

Mrs. ALICE FREEMAN PALMER, Cambridge, . . May 25, 1902. 

JOEL D. MILLER, A.M., Leominster, .... May 25, 1903. 

Mrs. KATE GANNETT WELLS, Boston, . . . May 25, 1904. 

FRANKLIN CARTER, Ph.D., LL.D., Williamstown, . May 25, 1905. 

GEORGE I. ALDRICH, A.M., Newtonville, . . . May 25, 1906. 

ELMER H. CAPEN, D.D,, Somerville, .... May 25, 1907. 

ELIJAH B. STODDARD, A.M., Worcester, . . . May 25, 1908. 



SECRETARY. 



FRANK A. HILL, A.M., 



Cambridge. 



CLERK AND TREASURER. 
C. B. TILLINGHAST, 



Boston. 



AGENTS. 

JOHN T. PRINCE, Ph.D., Newtonville. 

GRENVILLE T. FLETCHER, A.M., .... Northampton. 

HENRY T. BAILEY, ....... North Scituate. 

JAMES W. MACDONALD, A.M., Stoneham. 

BOARD OF VISITORS. 

Mrs. ALICE FREEMAN PALMER, Ph.D., L.H.D., . Cambridge. 

GEORGE I. ALDRICH, A.M., Newtonville. 



Instructors* 



W. A. BALDWIN, B.S., Principal, Psychology, Pedagogy, School 
Management, History of Education. Educated at Oswego Normal 
School, Cornell University, Harvard University. 

BERTHA M. BROWN, S.B., Biology, Mathematics. Educated at 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Marine Biological Laboratory, 
Wood's Holl. 

CATHERINE L. BIGELOW, Physical Training. Educated at Bos- 
ton Normal School of Gymnastics. 

FREDERIC H. HOLMES, Geography, Physics, Manual Training. 
Educated at Harvard University. 

MINERVA A. LAING, Chemistry, Minerals, Drawing. Educated at 
Oswego Normal School, Institute of Technology. 

HANNAH M. HARRIS, History, Literature. Educated at Farming- 
ton Normal School, Cornell University, University of Pennsylvania. 

EDMUND F. SAWYER, Music. Educated at Wesleyan University, 
New England Conservatory of Music. 

Training School. 
RICHARD W. MARSTON, Principal, grades eighth and ninth. 
Educated at Bridgewater Normal School. 

NELLIE E. WILBAR, grades sixth and seventh. Educated at 
Barnstable High School, Hyannis Summer Session. 

CATHERINE L. BIGELOW, grade fourth. Educated at Boston 
Norma] School of Gymnastics. 

ISADORE M. JONES, grade fifth. Educated at Bridgewater Normal 

School. 

MARIA FULLER, Principal Primary Department, grades second and 
third. Educated at 1'otsdam Normal School, post-graduate course. 

IDA E. FINLEY, grade first. Educated at Eramingham Normal 

School. 



State Normal School at Hyannis, 



HISTORICAL, 

In 1894 the Legislature of the Cammonwealth of ■ Massachusetts 
authorized the establishment of four new State normal schools, 
viz., one in the county of Barnstable, one in the city of Fitchburg, 
one in the city of Lowell and one in the city of North Adams. 
(Acts of 1894, chapter 457, sections 1-8.) 

The State Board of Education selected Hyannis as the most 
suitable location in the county of Barnstable. Two important 
conditions had been imposed by the State on the place in which 
the school should be located, namely, that it should pay into the 
State treasury $25,000, or such a part of this sum as should be 
necessary for the purchase of proper grounds for the school, and 
that a suitable training school should be established for the use of 
the normal school as a school of observation and practice. 

The people of Hyannis vied with each other in contributions to 
meet the first of these conditions. A splendid estate, consisting 
of about five acres, was purchased and contributed to the State. 
The second condition was met in the same spirit by the town of 
Barnstable, of which the village of Hyannis is a part. A fine 
modern brick building was erected for the training school. This 
building was very soon totally destroyed by fire, but, nothing- 
daunted, the town appropriated more money. A building in some 
respects better than the first one soon appeared. This is now the 
school home for all of the children of primary and grammar school 
age of the villages of Hyannis and Hyannisport. A picture 
of this building may be found opposite page 5, and its location 
relative to the other buildings may be seen in the picture opposite 
page 1. 

In 1895 the Legislature authorized the construction of a dormi- 
tory (Acts of 1895, chapter 345, section 1), and in 1897 a special 
act authorized the purchase of the residence connected with the 
afore-mentioned estate, the same to be used as the principal's resi- 
dence. • 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT RYAN MS. 



The school building and dormitory were completed and ready 
for occupancy when the school opened on Sept. 9, 1897. The 
entering class consisted of 31 women and 10 men. 




LOCATION. 

This school is located midway on Cape Cod, in the county of 
Barnstable, town of Barnstable and the village of Hyannis (see 
accompanying map). It is only seventy-nine miles from Boston, 
with which it is connected by the Cape Cod division of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. The train service is 
excellent, especially from June first to November first, when thou- 
sands of summer visitors sojourn for the whole or a part of the 
season on the Cape. 

Many people who have not visited Cape Cod, but who have 
gained their impressions from Thoreau's "Cape Cod," think of 
the whole section as a strip of desert sand with stunted vegetation 
and squalid homes. For the sake of correcting some of these 
false impressions a few facts are here submitted regarding the 
town of Barnstable and the village of Hyannis, in which the school 
is located. 

The town of Barnstable has a valuation of $3,943,940 and a 
population of 4,055. Hyannis is the largest and most thriving 
village in Hi is town. It is a village of homes, where the stranger 
is particularly struck with the trim, well-kept appearance of each 
house. The streets and walks are kept in excellent repair. The 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 7 

houses are built upon two or three parallel streets and a few cross 
streets, so that the village is about one and one-half miles long, 
with little width. It will be readily seen that a walk of five min- 
utes will take one out of the village into the country or down by 
the water. All about are delightful drives through forests of pine 
and oak. One may gain some idea of the beauty of the country 
from the accompanying pictures. The sea views which may be 
obtained from the school building are beyond description. Few 
places along our whole Atlantic coast afford anything so fine. 

An extension of Hyannis, its seaside resort, is Hyannisport. 
A summer visitor has described it as follows: "You leave the 
cars at Hyannis ; you mount into that Yankee conveyance known 
as a ' barge,' for the reason, probably, that it has no possible re- 
semblance to a barge ; you roll away through a lovely tree- shaded 
street, then through groves of pine and oak, till the moors about 
the port are gained. It is a pretty picture that you see, — the 
port curves its arm lovingly and the blue water nestles within its 
embrace. A tiny pier stretches from the land, finished by a toy 
pavilion ; dainty boats are moored in fleets beside it, and white 
sails cluster all about, while in the more distant offing large yachts 
and schooners are at anchor. There are hills sloping and rolling 
back to the horizon on every side. They are crowned with trees 
now and then, sometimes with cottages ; and climbing over the 
heights brown lengths of highway go wandering toward settle- 
ments farther inland. The drives are enchanting in all directions ; 
the air is fragrant with balsam odors and the faint iodine smell of 
the seaweed ; you wish for greater breathing power, and you find 
unusual exercise only a delight, never a fatigue." 

Hyannis is the trading center for the neighboring country and 
villages within a radius of ten or twelve miles. It has about thirty 
shops and stores, a national bank, a good hotel, well-equipped 
printing office, four churches, and a circulating library and free 
reading-room. 

A strong lecture course is supported by the people of the village, 
and arrangements have been perfected whereby the residents may 
have free access to the books of the Sturgis Library, one of the 
best and most carefully selected libraries in any of the villages of 
the State. 

The school buildings are very easy of access, being only five 
minutes' walk from the depot and the same distance from the post- 



8 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

office. In fact, the grounds are in the very midst of the village. 
It will be readily seen that the school has all the advantages of a 
quiet country location and at the same time is within easy reach of 
the conveniences of modern civilization. 



BUILDINGS. 

The buildings which are connected with the school are four in 
number, viz., the State Normal School, the dormitory, the train- 
ing school and the principal's residence. The relative position of 
these four buildings may be seen by comparing the picture of the 
grounds (opposite page 1) and that of the principal's residence 
(opposite page 10), if one remembers that the picture of the 
grounds was taken from a point just opposite to the barn, which 
may be seen in the rear of the principal's residence. 

The normal building (opposite page 5) is a substantial brick and 
stone structure, arranged and constructed for modern school work. 
All of the rooms are well lighted, the recitation rooms being on 
the east and south sides, while the dressing rooms, store rooms, 
offices and rooms for drawing take the light from the north. The 
heating and ventilation are by the " fan system." The building has 
been furnished and equipped in a plain but substantial manner. 
Everything is thoroughly modern and well adapted to the use for 
which it was purchased. 

On the first floor are the general and private offices, the ladies' 
cloak-room and toilet, the laboratory for biology, a recitation room 
for mathematics, one for psychology and pedagogy, and a third, 
which is not yet in use. On the second floor are the main hall, the 
library, the reading room, the laboratory and a store room for min- 
eralogy and geology, a recitation room for history and literature, 
and teachers' rest room. On the third floor are the laboratories and 
store rooms for physics and chemistry, a large room for drawing 
and a large lecture room for physics, chemistry, geography and 
kindred subjects. In the basement is a large gymnasium. Here 
are also two large, well-lighted rooms, one of which is now used 
as a coat room and lunch room for gentlemen, and the other as a 
work-shop. Both are well adapted to use for manual training 
laboratories. Next to the gymnasium is a room fitted with shower 
baths, wash basins and toilets. In the basement may also be 
found the engine room, with two mammoth boilers which supply 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNI8. 9 

steam for heating both the school building and the dormitory ; the 
steam pump, which pumps water to a reservoir in the top of 
the building, from which it is distributed to the school building, 
the dormitory and the premises ; the air pump and tank, which 
supplies air for the Johnson automatic system, which keeps the 
temperature in each room at 70 degrees ; the air pump and mixer, 
which connects with the gasoline tank situated outside in the 
grounds, and forces the gasoline to all parts of both buildings. 

The dormitory is built of brick with brown-stone trimmings. 
As already stated, it is heated and lighted from the plant located 
in the basement of the school building. This is the temporary 
home for the majority of our students, and great care has been 
taken to make it a comfortable, cheery, home-like place. On the 
basement floor are the dining room, kitchen, hall, pantry, baths, 
laundry, drying room, servants' sitting room and the store room. 
On the first floor are the parlor, alcoves, hall, guest room, matron's 
room, students' rooms and bath rooms. On the second floor are 
two teachers' rooms, pupils' rooms, a linen closet and bath rooms. 
The third floor is like the second. On the fourth floor are the 
servants' rooms. 

The dining room is well lighted and furnished with cosy tables 
which will seat four or six persons each (see cut opposite page 12). 

The parlor is furnished in mahogany, with rugs, draperies and 
curtains to correspond. A new piano and a well-selected library 
have been provided for the use of all (see cut opposite page 12). 

Each student's room is furnished in practically the same manner 
as the one photographed (see opposite page 12). Each has two 
windows, two large closets, a fixture for gasoline with Welsbach 
burner and one for electricity, a steam radiator and a ventilating 
flue. Each is furnished with a quartered oak bureau, commode, 
table, two rockers, two straight- backed chairs, with toilet set, 
screen, one large and two small rugs, and with two single iron 
beds, each bed being provided with a National spring, a first-class 
hair mattress, one live geese feather pillow and one hair pillow. 
Few dormitories are so comfortably equipped. 

CLIMATE. 
The climate is the mildest in the State. Zero weather is con- 
sidered extremely cold. There is little snow and cold spells are 
of short duration. The nearness of the gulf stream helps to make 



10 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

the winter climate here resemble that of the New Jersey coast 
much more than it does that of New England. In the summer 
the prevailing wind is from the south-west, and sweeping up over 
the whole length of Long Island Sound this is always cool, but 
with a certain balmy softness known so well to the habitats of 
Newport and Block Island. 

DESIGN OF THE SCHOOL. 

By the resolve of the Legislature under which normal schools 
were established their design is stated to be "qualifying teachers 
for the common schools in Massachusetts." It is more fully 
stated by a vote of the Board of Education passed May 6, 1880 : - — 

The design of the normal school is strictly professional; that is, to 
prepare in the best possible manner the pupils for the work of organizing, 
governing and teaching the public schools of the Commonwealth. 

To this end there must be the most thorough knowledge, first, of the 
branches of learning required to be taught in the schools ; second, of the 
best methods of teaching those branches ; and third, of right mental training. 

The time of one course extends through a period of two years, of the other 
through a period of four years, and is divided into terms of twenty weeks 
each, with daily sessions of not less than five days each week. 

COURSES OF STUDIES. 
The Two-years Course. 

1. Psychology, history of education, pedagogy, school organ- 
ization, school government and school laws of Massachusetts. 

2. Methods of teaching the following subjects : — 

(a) English, — reading, language, grammar, rhetoric, compo- 
sition, literature. 

(b) Mathematics, — arithmetic, elementary algebra and geom- 
etry. 

(c) Science, — minerals, plants, animals, physics, chemistry, 
geology, geography, physiology and hygiene, manual training. 

(d) Expression, — drawing, vocal music, physical training. 

3. Observation and practice in training school. 

The Four-years Course. 

1 . All of the work which is included in the two-years course. 

2. Advanced work in history, English literature, botany, 
zoology, geology, physics, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, 
astronomy, drawing, ethics. 



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STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 11 

3. Methods in Latin and French or German. 

4. Teaching of two or three subjects in the training school for 
one year each. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

A large factor in the training of every student is that which is 
obtained in connection with the training school. A large part of 
the work in methods in primary reading, primary and advanced 
number and physical training is given in connection with and by 
means of the class exercises in the regular school room. With 
the exception of a little professional work at the normal school, 
the last half of the senior year is devoted to observation and prac- 
tice. Students are assigned to either primary or grammar sec- 
tions, in accordance with their desires or apparent fitness. They 
are at once set to observing and assisting. As fast as a student 
develops sufficient power he is given a class to teach in one sub- 
ject. He prepares each lesson under the supervision of the 
teacher in charge of that subject, and his teaching is criticised by 
this teacher and by the principal of the department in which he is 
teaching. As soon as seems advisable another subject is added, 
and before completing the course the student is given an oppor- 
tunity to have full charge of a room. 

Each student has to do about six weeks of observation work 
and fifteen weeks of teaching in the regular two-years course. 

The connection between the normal and training schools is very 
close. Every teacher of the normal school does some regular 
teaching of the children in the training school during a part of 
the school year. He also supervises the work of his department 
in the training school. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Candidates for admission to any one of the normal schools must 
have attained the age of seventeen years complete, if young men, 
and sixteen years, if young women ; and must be free from any 
disease or infirmity which would unfit them for the office of 
teacher. They must present certificates of good moral character, 
give evidence of good intellectual capacity and be graduates of 
high schools whose courses of study have been approved by the 
Board of Education, or they must have received, to the satisfac- 
tion of the principal and the Board of Visitors of the school, the 



12 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

equivalent of a high school education. The candidate will do well 
to present a written statement from his high school principal, 
showing in clear and discriminating terms the character of his 
scholarship and conduct while in the high school. Such state- 
ments will receive very careful consideration. 

Candidates must declare their intention to teach in the schools 
of the State, to abide by the requirements of the school, and, if 
possible to complete the course of study. 



TIME OF ADMISSION. 

New classes will be admitted only at the beginning of the fall 
term, and, as the studies of the course are arranged progressively 
from that time, it is important that students shall present them- 
selves then for duty. In individual cases and for strong reasons 
exceptions to this requirement are permissible, but only after due 
examination and upon the understanding that the admission shall 
be at a time convenient to the school and to such classes only as 
the candidate is qualified to join. 



WRITTEN EXAMINATIONS. 

Hereafter, until further notice, the written examinations will 
embrace papers on the following groups, a single paper with a 
maximum time allowance of two hours to cover each of groups 1, 
2 and 4, and a single paper with a maximum time allowance of 
one hour to cover each of groups 3 and 5 (in all, five papers, with 
a maximum time allowance of eight hours) : — 

1. Languages. — (a) English, with its grammar and litera- 
ture, and (b) one of the three languages, — Latin, French and 
German. 

2. Mathematics. — (a) Arithmetic, (6) the elements of algebra, 
and (c) the elements of plane geometry. 

?> . History and Geography. — The history and civil government 
of Massachusetts and the United States, with related geography 
and so much of English history as is directly contributory to a 
knowledge of United States history. 

4. Sciences*— (a) Physical geography, (6) physiology and 
hygiene, (c) physics, (d) botany, and (e) chemistry. 




DINING HALL— DORMITORY. 




PARLOR — DORMITORY. 




GUEST CHAMBER — DORMITORY. 




TYPICAL STUDENT'S ROOM. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNJS. 18 

5. Drawing and Music. — (a) Elementary, mechanical and 
freehand drawing, with any one of the topics, form, color and 
arrangement, and (b) musical notation. 

ORAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Candidates will be questioned orally either upon some of the 
foregoing subjects or upon matters of common interest to them 
and the school, at the discretion of the examiners. In this inter- 
view the object is to gain some impression about the candidates' 
personal characteristics and their use of language, as well as to 
give them an opportunity to furnish any evidences of qualification 
that might not otherwise become known to their examiners. Any 
work of a personal, genuine and legitimate character that candi- 
dates have done in connection with any of the groups that are set 
for examination, and that is susceptible of visible or tangible pres- 
entation, may be offered at this time, and such work will be duly 
weighed in the final estimate, and may even determine it. To 
indicate the scope of this feature the following kinds of possible 
presentation are suggested, but the candidates may readily extend 
the list : — 

1 . A book of drawing exercises, — particularly such a book of 
exercises as one might prepare in following the directions in "An 
Outline of Lessons in Drawing for Ungraded Schools," prepared 
under the direction of the Massachusetts Board of Education, or 
in developing any branch of that scheme. 

2. Any laboratory note-book that is a genuine record of ex- 
periments performed, data gathered or work clone, with the usual 
accompaniments of diagrams, observations and conclusions. 

3. Any essay or article that presents the nature, successive 
steps and conclusion of any simple, personally conducted inves- 
tigation of a scientific character, with such diagrams, sketches, 
tables and other helps as the character of the work may suggest. 

4. Any exercise book containing compositions, abstracts, 
analyses or other written work that involves study in connection 
with the literature requirements of the examination. 

Specimens of written work or of drawing should be identified by 
the signature of the principal of the school as the work of the 
student who presents them. 



14 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



EXPLANATION OF ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS. 

I. Languages. 

(a) English. — The importance of a good preparation in English 
is never overrated. The requirements in this department are 
based upon those generally agreed upon by the colleges and high 
technical schools of New England. Applicants are strongly ad- 
vised to read, either in school or by themselves, all the works 
named ; but, until further notice, a candidate will not be rejected 
who passes a satisfactory examination upon one-half of those 
assigned, — the selection to be made by herself or by her school. 

No candidate will be accepted whose written English is notably 
deficient in clear and accurate expression, spelling, punctuation, 
idiom or division of paragraphs, or whose spoken English exhibits 
faults so serious as to make it inexpedient for the normal school 
to attempt their correction. The candidate's English, therefore, 
in all oral and written examinations will be subject to the require- 
ments implied in the foregoing statement and marked accordingly. 

1. Beading and Practice. — This part of the examination will 
be upon the subject-matter and upon the lives of the authors, and 
its form will usually be the writing of brief paragraphs on each of 
several topics selected by the candidate from a considerable num- 
ber, and its chief purpose will be to test, her power of clear and 
accurate expression. In place of a part or the whole of this test 
the candidate may present an exercise book, properly certified by 
her instructor, containing compositions or other written work done 
in connection with the reading of the book. The books set for 
this part of the examination will be : — 

1901 and 1902. — Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice; 
Pope's Iliad, Books L, VI., XXII. and XXIV. ; The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers in The Spectator; Goldsmith's The Vicar of 
Wakefield; Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; 
Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans; Tennyson's The Princess; 
Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal ; George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

1903, 1904 and 1905. —Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice 
and Julius Ccesar; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in The 
Spectator; Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's The 
Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; 




GENERAL OFFICE AND RECEPTION ROOM. 




PRIVATE OFFICE. 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 15 

Tennyson's The Princess; Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal ; 
George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

In preparation for this part of the requirement, it is important 
that the candidate shall have been instructed in the fundamental 
principles of rhetoric. 

2. Study and Practice. — This part of the examination presup- 
poses a more careful study of each of the books uamed below. 
The examination will be upon subject-matter, form and structure, 
and will also test the candidate's ability to express her knowledge 
with clearness and accuracy. The books set for this part of the 
examination will be : — 

1901 and 1902. — Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, 
Comus, U Allegro and II Penseroso ; Burke's Speech on Concilia- 
tion with America; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

1903, 1904 and 1905. — Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's 
Lycidas, Comus, U Allegro, and 11 Penseroso ; Burke's Speech on 
Conciliation with America; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and 
Addison. 

In addition, the candidate may be required to answer questions 
involving the essentials of English grammar, and questions on the 
leading facts in those periods of English literary history to which 
the prescribed works belong. 

The Conference on Uniform Entrance Requirements also recom- 
mends the following : — 

1. That English be studied throughout the primary and sec- 
ondary school courses, and, when possible, for at least three 
periods a week during the four years of the high school course. 

2. That the prescribed books be regarded as a basis for such, 
wider courses of English study as the schools may arrange for 
themselves. 

3. That, where careful instruction in idiomatic English transla- 
tion is not given, supplementary work to secure an equivalent 
training in diction and in sentence-structure be offered throughout 
the high school course. 

4. That a certain amount of outside reading, chiefly of poetry, 
fiction, biography and history, be encouraged throughout the entire 
school course. 

5. That definite instruction be given in the choice of words, in 
the structure of sentences and of paragraphs, and in the simple 



16 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

forms of narration, description, exposition and argument. Such 
instruction should begin early in the high school course. 

6. That systematic training in speaking and writing English be 
given throughout the entire school course. That, in the high 
school, subjects for compositions be taken, partly from the pre- 
scribed books and partly from the student's own thought and 
experience. 

7. That each of the books prescribed for study be taught with 
reference to — 

(a) The language, including the meaning of the words and 
sentences, the important qualities of style and the important allu- 
sions. 

(b) The plan of the work, i. e., its structure and method. 

(c) The place of the work in literary history, the circumstances 
of its production and the life of its author. 

That all details be studied, not as ends in themselves, but as 
means to a comprehension of the whole. 

(b) One only of the three languages, — Latin, French and 
German. The translation at sight of simple prose, with questions 
on the usual forms and ordinary constructions of the language. 
The candidate is earnestly advised to study Latin and either 
French or German. 

II. Mathematics. 

(a) Arithmetic. — Such an acquaintance with the subject as 
may be gained in a good grammar school. 

(b) Algebra. — The mastery of any text-book suitable for the 
youngest class in a high school, through cases of affected quadratic 
equations involving one unknown quantity. 

(c) Geometry. — The elements of plane geometry as presented 
in any high school text-book. While a fair acquaintance with 
ordinary book work in geometry will, for the present, be accepted, 
candidates are advised, so far as practicable, to do original work 
witli both theorems and problems, and an opportunity will be 
offered them, by means of alternative questions, to test their abil- 
ity in such work. 

III. History and Geography. 
Any school text-book on United States history will enable can- 
didates to meet this requirement, provided they study enough of 
geography to illumine the history, and make themselves familiar 




DRAWING ROOM. 




TYPICAL RECITATION ROOM, 




CORNER OF LIBRARY. 




READING ROOM. 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNJS. 17 

with the grander features of government in Massachusetts and the 
United States. Collateral reading in United States history is 
strongly advised. 

IV. Sciences. 

(a) Physical Geography. — The mastery of the elements of 
this subject as presented in the study of geography in a good 
grammar school. If the grammar school work is supplemented by 
the study of some elementary text-book on physical geography, 
better preparation still is assured. 

(b) Physiology and Hygiene. — The chief elementary facts of 
anatomy, the general functions of the various organs, the more 
obvious rules of health, and the more striking effects of alcoholic 
drinks, narcotics and stimulants upon those addicted to their use. 

(c) (d) and (e) Physics, Chemistry and Botany. — The ele- 
mentary principles of these subjects so far as they may be pre- 
sented in the courses usually devoted to them in good high schools. 
Study of the foregoing sciences, or some of them, with the aid of 
laboratory methods, is earnestly recommended. 

V. Drawing and Music. 

(a) Drawing. — Mechanical and freehand drawing, — enough 
to enable the candidates to draw a simple object, like a box or a 
pyramid or a cylinder, with plan and elevation to scale, and to 
make a freehand sketch of the same in perspective. Also any one 
of the three topics, form, color and arrangement. 

(b) Music. — The elementary principles of musical notation, 
such as an instructor should know in teaching singing in the 
schools. Ability to sing, while not required, will be prized as an 
additional qualification. 

Preliminary Examination. 
1 . Candidates may be admitted to a preliminary examination a 
year in advance of their final examination, provided they offer 
themselves in one or more of the following groups, each group to 
be presented in full : — 

II. Mathematics. 

III. History and Geography. 

IV. Sciences. 

V. Drawing and Music. 



18 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

Preliminary examinations can be taken in June only. 

Every candidate for a preliminary examination must present a 
certificate of preparation 'in the group or groups chosen, or in the 
subjects thereof, the form of certificate to be substantially as 
follows : — 



_has been a pupil in 



for years and is, in my 

judgment, prepared to pass the normal school preliminary examination in the 
following group or groups of subjects and the divisions thereof: 



Signature, 



Address, . 

2. The group known as I. Languages must be reserved for 
the final examinations. It will doubtless be found generally ad- 
visable in practice that the group known as IV. Sciences should 
also be so reserved. 

Candidates for the final or complete examinations are earnestly 
advised to present themselves, so far as practicable, in June. 
Division of the final or complete examinations between June and 
September is permissible ; but it is important both for the candi- 
date and the normal school that the work laid out for the Septem- 
ber examinations, which so closely precede the opening of the 
school, shall be kept down to a minimum. 

It may be said, in general, that, if the ordinary work of a good 
statutory high school, as defined by section 2, chapter 496 of the 
Acts of 1898, is well done, a student should be able to meet the 
requirements of these examinations. All candidates are advised 
to bring as full a statement of the work they have done during 
their high-school courses, as well as an account of the degree of 
success which has crowned their efforts, as they can procure. A. 
good record in the high school is of prime importance to all candi- 
dates. Evidence of mental power, as shown in original and 
independent methods and results of work, will go far to satisfy the 
examiners of the fitness of those who may not have met success- 
fully all the contingencies of the formal examination. 




NORMAL HALL 




LECTURE ROOM. 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT ITYANNIS. 10 

Reasonable allowance in equivalents will be made in case a 
candidate, for satisfactory reasons, has not taken a study named 
for examination. Successful experience in teaching will be taken 
into account, according to its amount and nature, in the determi- 
nation of equivalents in the entrance examinations. 

FREE TUITION. 

Residents of Massachusetts declaring their intention to teach in 
the State will not be required to pay tuition ; but each pupil from 
another State shall pay at the beginning of each half-year session 
the sum of twenty-five dollars for the use of the school. 

, BOARDING HALL. 

Non-resident students are expected to board in the dormitory, 
or in private families approved by the principal. 

The State has erected, furnished and keeps in repair this fine 
building without expense to the students. All money paid for 
board is therefore expended for provisions, fuel, lights and ser- 
vice. Thus first-class accommodations and excellent board are 
furnished at a very low rate. The cost to students is $160 for the 
school year of forty weeks. Board is payable quarterly, in ad- 
vance, i. e., $40 at the beginning of each ten weeks of the school 
year. 

Students who go home regularly on Friday nights will be allowed 
a suitable reduction from the above-named prices. 

FURNITURE. 
Each boarder is expected to furnish bedding, towels, napkins 
and napkin-ring, and clothes-bags. It will be well for each to 
bring four pillow cases, three sheets, two blankets and one cover- 
let. Every article of clothing must be distinctly and indelibly 
marked with the owner's name. 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Text-books and reference books are loaned to the students free 
of charge, but they are expected to pay for any damage to books 
or furniture which they may be using, to buy their own paper and 
note-books and to pay for breakage in the laboratory work. The 
total of such expenses for a year is only a few dollars. 



20 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, 

Students and candidates for admission who have done excellent 
work in the high school and are strong physically, but who cannot 
obtain sufficient money at home for their support through school, 
may apply for assistance from one or both of the sources described 
below. It will be understood that only a small number can be 
assisted each year and great care will be exercised in selecting 
such applicants as are particularly promising and most in need of 
such assistance. 

During the present school year eleven applicants have received 
loans of one hundred dollars or less each. The trustees are not 
authorized to loan more than one hundred dollars per year to any 
one student without a vote of the contributors. 

Student's Loan Fund. 

The fund herein described shall be known as the Student's Loan 
Fund for the State Normal School at Hyannis. 

This fund shall be supported by voluntary loans of one hundred 
dollars each for a term of five years, the amount remaining at the 
end of such time, with all interest which may have accrued on the 
same, to be divided pro rata among those who have contributed. 

This fund shall be administered by three trustees, who shall be 
chosen each year by the contributors from among their own 
number. 

This fund shall, so far as practicable, be used to loan in such 
sums and to such students of the State Normal School at Hyannis 
as the trustees may, after careful investigation, consider proper 
recipients of such loans. 

The personal note of the pupil receiving the loan, with or with- 
out indorsement, payable in five years or less, with interest at four 
per cent., shall be taken and held by the trustees. 

Such a part of this fund as may not, at any time, be loaned 
shall be invested at the discretion of said trustees. 

Money can be appropriated from this fund only on the order of 
two of said trustees. 

Trustees for 1899-1900: W. A. Baldwin, Principal State 
Normal School; Edward L. Chase, Treasurer county of Barn- 
stable; G. W. Doane, M.D. 




PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 




BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 




MINERALOGICAL LABORATORY. 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 21 



State Aid. 

The State appropriates four thousand dollars per annum for the 
normal schools, which is given to promising pupils who are unable, 
without assistance, to meet all their expenses ; but no one receives 
such assistance till the second term of the course. 

Any one desiring to obtain assistance through the Student's 
Loan Fund or the State Aid Fund should apply to the principal of 
the school for the proper blanks. 

Normal School Scholarships at Harvard University. 

There are eight scholarships in the scientific school at Harvard 
University for the benefit of normal schools. The annual value 
of each of the scholarships is one hundred and fifty dollars, which 
is the price of tuition, so that the holder of the scholarship gets 
his tuition free. The incumbents are originally appointed for one 
year, on the recommendation of the principal of the school from 
which they have graduated. These appointments may be annually 
renewed on the recommendation of the faculty of the scientific 
school. 

SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 

The government of the school is placed, as far as possible, on 
the shoulders of the governed. Students are expected to do their 
part toward their own best development. The theory is that self- 
government develops character. These students will soon be 
teachers and so engaged in governing others ; before they can 
control others they must be able to control themselves. If this 
power is not already theirs it should be developed. The best 
way to grow in this direction is to practice self-control. Each 
student is expected to feel responsible not only for his own con- 
duct but for the welfare of the school. A committee is elected by 
the students from among their own number to hear complaints 
and to confer with the principal regarding anything which has to 
do with the comfort and well-being of the student body. 

Habits of regularity, particularly in eating, sleeping, study and 
recreation, are considered of prime importance, and regulations 
covering these points have been adopted by the students who 
board at the dormitory. 



22 STATE N0B3IAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

The government at the dormitory is in the hands of the stu- 
dents. They select a committee of three, one for each floor, every 
ten weeks. This committee acts as a committee on rules and 
regulations, and has charge of the execution of the same. 

Other committees elected are a social committee and a commit- 
tee to act as heads of tables during each meal. The principal 
confers with these committees whenever it seems desirable. 

THE SCHOOL AND THE PUBLIC. 

The school holds itself in readiness to respond to calls from the 
superintendents and teachers of the vicinity for any assistance 
which it can render. It welcomes all interested visitors to its 
sessions or to inspect its equipment. Rooms are gladly provided 
for teachers' meetings and for lectures which are of a distinctly 
educational value. 

During the present school year a very successful institute con- 
vened here. Practically every teacher of the county was in 
attendance. 

An Educational Round Table for Barnstable County has been 
organized, and holds three meetings a year in the normal building. 

Many committee meetings have been held in connection with the 
organization of a lecture course for the village, the extension of 
library privileges, and village improvement society. 

For particulars regarding the regular or summer sessions, ad- 
dress the principal. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 23 



List of Students* 



Advanced Class. 

Crowell, Alice M., . . . . . . . . South Yarmouth. 

Crowell, Annie S., South Yarmouth. 

Fisk, H. Frank, West Dennis. 

Goodspeed, David H., Santuit. 

Linnell, Vida F., Hyannisport. 

Taylor, Ruth A., Hyannis. 

Senior Class. 

Blachford, Lois J., Dennisport. 

Bunker, Mina G., Cottage City. 

Chase, Bessie A., Maiden. 

Cobb, Ethel F., South Truro. 

Crowell, Carrie E., . West Dennis. 

Elcock, Alicia B., West Quincy. 

Elcock, Frances J., West Quincy. 

Foster, Mary H., Brewster. 

Haas, Minnie E., Boston. 

Hathaway, Florence S., Pottersville. 

Johnson, William F , Provincetown. 

Marston, Maude H., Cummaquid. 

McDonald, Mary P., . . . . . . Fall River. 

McKenney, Flora P., . ' Fall River. 

Metcalf , Lucie A. , Norwood. 

Murphy, Mary J., Fall River. 

O'Dea, Margaret M., Fall River. 

Phinney, Clara E., Barnstable. 

Pidgeon, Lizzie M., Provincetown. 

Robbins, Flora B., Dennisport. 

Rogers, Raymond W., . . . .' . • East Harwich. 

Rinn, Ethel, Atlantic. 

Small, Marion C, Provincetown. 

Wellman, Eleanor M., Boston. 

Wixon, Grace D., Dennisport. 

Junior Class. 

Arey, Gertrude M., Yarmouthport. 

Bacon, MillicentL., Hyannis. 

Brine, Julia A., Hyannis. 

Brophy, Julia C, Fall River. 



24 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Brow, Frances I. 
Case, Maud L., 
Crocker, Charlotte L 
Curran, Mary N., 
Douglas, Mabel F., 
Dunham, Ethel W., 
Hinckley, Annie G. 
Howes, Edith G., 
Kelly, Mary C, 
Litchfield, Sadie A. 
McKenney, Elena H 
Mernin, Mary E., 
Murphy, Helena M. 
Quinn, Mary E., 
Roche, Honora M., 
Scan Ian, Katherine 
Slavin, Annie, . 
Smith, Eliza F., 
Snow, Christabel, 
Soper, Henrietta I., 
Walsh, Alice A., 
Whorf, Isaiah A., 



Fall River. 

Hyannis. 

Cotuit. 

Fall River. 

Plymouth. 

Nantucket. 

East Barnstable. 

Yarmouthport. 

Fall River. 

Norwell. 

Fall River. 

Fall River. 

Fall River. 

Fall River. 

Fall River. 

Fall River. 

Chatham. 

Hyannis. 

Wellfleet. 

Boston. 

Fall River. 

Provincetown. 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 25 



Calendar. 



1901. 




Jan. 


1 


Feb. 


6, 


March 


29 


April 


8. 


June 


24. 


Sept. 10, 


11, 


Sept. 


12. 


Nov. 


27, 


Dec. 


2, 


Dec. 


20 


1902 




Jan. 


1. 


Feb. 


5, 


Mar. 


28 


April 


7, 


June 


23 



Tuesday night, Christmas recess ends. 
Wednesday morning, second term begins. 
Friday night, spring recess begins. 
Monday night, spring recess ends. 
Monday, public graduation. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, second entrance exam- 
inations. 
Thursday, school year begins. 
Wednesday night, Thanksgiving recess begins. 
Monday night, Thanksgiving recess ends. 
Friday night, Christmas recess begins. 



Wednesday night, Christmas recess ends. 
Wednesday morning, second term begins. 
Friday night, spring recess begins. 
Monday night, spring recess ends. 
Monday, public graduation. 



NOTICE. 

Entrance examinations begin at 9 o'clock in Normal Hall. 
All candidates should be present at the opening on both days. 
For further information address the principal personally or by 
letter at Hyannis, Mass. 



Catalogue 



OF 



Summer Session 



28 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Summer Session of State Normal School at 

Hyannis* 



Fourth Session. — July 9 to August 9, 1901. 

Purpose. — To afford professioual training to teachers now in 
service. 

Work. — Like that which is offered in the regular courses. 

Instructors. — Mostly teachers from other normal schools. 

Diplomas. — Granted on completion of course. 

Tuition. — Free to all who intend to teach in the State. 

Expenses. — Board and lodging in the dormitory, $5.50 for 
women and $5.75 for men. Books, paper and laboratory materials 
at cost. 

Buildings. — New, well equipped and well adapted to their pur- 
poses. 

Location. — On the south side of Cape Cod. 

Climate. — Tempered in winter and summer by sea breezes ; 
prevailing wind from southwest, coming over Long Island Sound. 

Recreations. — Sea-bathing delightful ; fishing and boating ex- 
cellent in ocean, bays and lakes ■ walks and drives unsurpassed ; 
good bicycling over State roads. 

Purpose op this School. 
It is believed that many teachers now in service in Massachu- 
setts realize their need of professional training. Every teacher, 
worthy the name, feels the need of such inspiration as comes from 
regular intensive study during some part of each year. To meet 
this need the State has appropriated money for the support of this 
summer session. Thus is inaugurated a movement for the im- 
provement of teachers now at work in our schools. Here those 
who feel obliged to teach during the regular school year will have 
an opportunity to take work equal in value to that which is usually 
offered in normal schools. A teacher can attend this school for 
two or three summers, then secure a leave of absence for one year, 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNTS. 29 

spend this year at tbe Hyannis Normal School, return to her posi- 
tion, then attend the school for two more summers, thus complet- 
ing her course. 

The purpose of the instructors of this school will be to give 
regular, systematic courses in such subjects and of such character 
as will meet the needs of teachers now in service. 

Character of the Work. 

The work will be like the regular work of the school year. The 
same amount of study, of lecture room and of laboratory time will 
be required in each subject. 

Students may take one or more subjects, but the work must be 
intensive in each. 

The work is so planned that it is not possible to take more than 
two of the heavier subjects, and students are earnestly advised to 
take but one. 

Credits allowed. 

Due credits will be allowed for work which has been done in 
other normal schools or in colleges. 

Teachers in service may be allowed to offer their experience be- 
tween the successive summer sessions in lieu of practice in the 
training school. 

Diplomas granted. 

Credit will be given for each subject that is satisfactorily com- 
pleted. A diploma will be awarded when the amount of work 
done by the student is equal to that required in the regular course. 

The time required for earning a diploma will depeud upon the 
former preparation and upon the amount and character of work at 
this school. 

Admission. 

Teachers of maturity, who have been in service for two or more 
years, and graduates of four-year courses in high schools, who 
have taught one year, will be admitted without examination. 

Graduates of high schools, and teachers of less than the above 
required experience who desire to teach in the State may be ad- 
mitted without examination, but without entrance examinations 
cannot receive credit to count toward a diploma. 



30 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



General Regulations regarding Credits to be allowed 

Students from Other Normal Schools, 

Training Schools and Colleges. 

1 . The matter of the granting of credits shall be in the hands 
of a special committee, consisting of the principal and two other 
members of the summer session faculty, subject to the approval of 
the Board of Visitors of the school. 

2. A student who has had one year or less of work in another 
State normal school shall receive full credit for the same, but the 
time needed to complete the course shall depend upon the charac- 
ter of the work done here. 

3. A graduate of any State normal school outside of the State 
of Massachusetts shall be required to do the work of four summers 
before receiving a diploma, unless the character of the work done 
is particularly strong. 

4. A candidate from a training school, whose past record is 
particularly strong and the character of whose work is exception- 
ally good, may be given such credit as seems just in the judgment 
of the special committee and the Board of Visitors. 

5. A graduate of any college shall be required to take a full 
year's work, including the subjects of psychology, pedagogy and 
such typical subjects as may be deemed advisable by the special 
committee and the Board of Visitors, and to furnish evidence of 
at least three years of successful experience. 

6. Due credit will be allowed for undergraduate work in any 
college. 

7. Three years of properly certified, successful experience may 
be accepted in all cases in lieu of teaching in the training school. 



List of Subjects and Instructors. 

Music— Edmund F. Sawyer, Instructor in Music, State Normal School, 
Hyannis, Mass. 

Pedagogy. — Mary E Laing, formerly Instructor in Pedagogy, State 
Normal School, Oswego, N. Y. 

English. — Elizabeth II. Spalding, Instructor in English, Pratt Institute, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Geography. — Charles Peter Sinnott, Instructor in Geography, State 
Normal School, Bridgewater, Mass. 

Arithmetic. — Sarah J. Walter, Principal of Training School, Williman- 
tic, Conn. 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNfS. 



31 



Physics. — Frederic H. Holmes, 'Instructor in Physics, State Normal 
School, Hyannis, Mass. 

History. — C. L. G. Scales, Instructor in History, State Normal School, 
Oswego, N. Y. 

Drawing. — F. L. Burnham, Supervisor of Drawing, New Haven, Conn. 

Minerals, Bocks and Soils. — Harlan P. Shaw, Instructor in Minerals, 
Geology and Chemistry, State Normal School, Bridgewater, Mass. 

Zoology. — Ida H. Hyde, Instructor in Zoology, University of Kansas. 

It is not expected that a class will be formed in any of the 
above-mentioned subjects unless several students desire to take 
the same. 

General Lectures. 
Besides the regular work, general lectures will be given by 
lecturers of national reputation. 

Lecturers of 1900. 

Edward Howard Griggs, recently Professor in the Department of Peda- 
gogy, Leland Stanford, Jr., University, California. 
Mrs. Kate Tryon, Lecturer on Birds and their Habits. 
Frank E. Gurney, Instructor, State Normal School, Bridgewater, Mass. 
Sarah Louise Arnold, Supervisor of Schools, Boston. 
George H. Martin, Supervisor of Schools, Boston. 



8.00-8.45. 
Number. 

8.50-9.35. 
Number. 

9.40-9.55. 



Daily Program of 1900. 
Pedagogy, History, Music, Drawing, Geometry, Minerals, 

Pedagogy, History, Music, Drawing, Geometry, Minerals, 



Morning exercises. 
10.00-10.45. Plants, Geography, Physics, Algebra, Literature. 
10.50-11.35. Plants, Geography, Physics, Algebra, Literature. 
2.00-4.00. Laboratory work. 



Name. 
Alden, Mabel F., . 
Allen, Lucy H. 
Andrews, Ella, 
Andrews, Harriet, . 
Arey, Bertha M., . 
Arnold, Melville A., 
Ashton, Mary T., . 
Atherton, M. Grace, 



List of Students, 1900. 

Residence. 

. Holbrook, 

. Woodstock Valley, Ct.. 

. Roxbury, . 

. Hyannis, . 

. Chatham, . 

. Adams, 

. Dartmouth, 

. Wakefield, 



Session. Experience. 
1900, 3£ years. 
1900, 4 
1900, 15 

1899, - 

1900, 5 
1900, 18 
1900, 3 
1899, 3 



32 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Name. 


Eesidence. 


Session. 


Experience. 


Atkins, Bertha A., 


. Pleasant Lake, . 


. ■ . 1899, 


3 


years. 


Atkins, Caroline L., 


. Brookline, 


. 1899, 


1 


year. 


Austin, Ida M., 


. Fitchburg, 


. 1899, 


12 


years. 


Austin, Laura C, . 


. Brunswick, Me., 


. 1898-1899, 


5 


< i 


Ayles, Elizabeth, . 


. West Newton, . 


. 1898, 


22 


" 


Baker, Dora M., . 


. West Yarmouth, 


. 1898-1900, 


- 




Baker, Mabel L , . 


. Hyannis, . 


1898-1899-1900, 


8 


< c 


Ballou, Madge D., 


. Hyde Park, 


. 1900, 


7 


" 


Barney, Emma E., 


. South Hadley Falls, 


. 1898, 


8 


" 


Bassett, Lina M., . 


Sandwich, 


. 1899, 


1 


year. 


Batchelder, Mary H., 


. Holyoke, . 


. 1899-1900, 


5 


years. 


Batchelder, Nellie S., 


. Holyoke, . 


. 1900, 


- 




Bates, Nellie P., . 


. Whitman, 


1898-1899-1900, 


7 


«' 


Bates, Mabel, 


. East Wareham, 


. 1900, 


3 


" 


Bearse, Annie B., . 


. Hyannis, . 


. 1898-1899, 


12 


" 


Benjamin, Clara B., 


. Watertown, 


. 1899, 


2 


t( 


Bennett, Ellen F., . 


. Warwick, 


. 1898, 


1 


year. 


Berry, Sheba E., . 


. Chelsea, . 


. 1898, 


10 


years. 


Billings, Emma E., 


. North Adams, . 


. 1898, 


- 




Bird, Annie L., 


. Walpole, . 


. 1898, 


15 


« 


Blake, Etta S., 


. Presque Isle, Me., 


. 1898-1899, 


11 


" 


Bliss, Elizabeth R., 


. Taunton, . 


. 1898, 


24 


<( 


Bodfish, John D. W., 


. West Barnstable, 


. 1899, 


- 




Boomer, Emily R., 


. North Dartmouth, . 


. 1898-1899, 


8 


< < 


Bowen, Warren R., 


. Salem, 


. 1898, 


5 


" 


Bradford, Anna H., 


. Brockton, 


. 1900, 


_ 




Bratten, Theodora M., 


. Belmont, . 


. 1900, 


_ 




Brien,EffieM., . 


. West Roxbury, 


. 1899, 


7 


<( 


Bright, Mary E., . 


. Franklin, . 


. 1900, 


1 


year. 


Buck, Clara D., . 


West Chatham, 


. 1899, 


5 


years. 


Buckley, Mary, 


. Hyannis, . 


. 1898, 


11 


<< 


Burden, Catharine A., 


. Maiden, . 


. 1898-1899, 


1 


year. 


Butters, Ellen J., . 


. Franklin, . 


. 1900, 


_ 




Cady, Anita L., 


. Southbridge, 


. 1898, 


_ 




Campbell, Sadie M., 


. Hudson, . 


1898-1899-1900, 


3 


years. 


Campos, Celestino, 


. Mexico, . 


. 1900, 


3 




Carpenter, Grace W., 


. Foxborough, 


. 1898, 


8 




Chace, Seth Howard, 


. Harwich, . 


1898-1899-1900, 


7 




Chase, Bessie A., . 


. Maiden, . 


. 1899-1900, 


2 




Chase, Charlotte M., 


. Cambridge, 


. 1899, 


25 




Chisholm, Mary A., 


. Melrose Highlands, 


. 1899, 


2 




Church, Myra H., . 


. Lawrence, 


. 1900, 


1* 




Clark, Amy C, 


. Middleborough, 


. 1898-1900, 


9 




Clarke, Alice W., . 


. Uxbridge, . 


. 1898, 


_ 




Clement, Abbie L., 


. Merrimac, 


. 1899, 


4 




Clifford, Sara A., . 


. Holyoke, . 


. 1898, 


10 




Coar, Emily M., . 


. Westfield, 


. 1898, 


10 





STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



S3 





Name. 


Residence. Session. 


Experience. 


Coburn 


, Clara H., . 


Methuen, 1899, 


2 


years. 


Coffin, 


Lizzie H., . 


Marblehead, 






1898, 


11 


<< 


Conant 


Clara E., . 


Greenfield, 






. 1898, 


17 


• < 


Conant 


Harold S., 


Gloucester, 






. 1900, 


_ 




Conner 


, Lucy B., . 


Exeter, N. H., . 






1898, 


2£ 


t < 


Costello, Mary E , . 


Quincy, . 






1900, 


3 


< < 


Cowen, 


Jennie L. F., 


Rochester, 






1898, 


- 




Crafts, 


H. Gertrude, 


Chelsea, . 






1898, 


5 


" 


Craigie 


Louise M , 


Oswego, N. Y., 






1900, 


7 


<< 


Crocker, Bertha, . 


Hyannis, . 






1898, 


6 


< < 


Crocker, Eloise H., 


Hyannis, . 






1899, 


1 


year. 


Crocker, Grace F., 


Brewster, . 






1900, 


1 


i < 


Crowell 


, Myra D , . 


Chatham, . 






1900, 


9 


years. 


Cunningham, Mary G., . 


Revere, 






1899, 


5 


(< 


Daggetl 


;, Cora M , . 


Provincetown, . 






1899, 


5 


" 


Dally, Marion L., . 


Roxbury, . 






1900, 


11 


« 


Davies, 


James, 


W. Springfield, 






1900, 


- 




Davies, 


Maude, 


Norwich, Conn., 






1900, 


4£ 


(C 


Davis, Kate G., 


Westport, 






1898, 


8 


(< 


Dean, Carrie B.., . 


Taunton, . 






1899, 


9 


" 


Deane, 


Florence, . 


Middleborough, 




1898-1899, 


10 


<( 


Deane, 


MaryE., . 


Middleborough, 




. 1898-1899, 


14 


it 


Delano, 


Bertha F., 


Marion, 




. 1899, 


- 




Dickey, 


NellieS,. 


Derry, N. H., . 




. 1898, 


18 


(( 


Dinsmore, Jessie M., 


Medford, . 




. 1900, 


17 


" 


Dinzey, 


Amy N., . 


Boston, 




. 1899, 


1 


year. 


Dodge, 


Carrie M. , . 


Stoughton, 




. 1898, 


2 


years. 


Donegan, Minnie H., 


North Abington, 




. 1900, 


2 


tt 


Dougherty, Margaret E., 


Southbridge, 




. 1899, 


2 


" 


Douglas 


, Linda L., 


Sagamore, 




. 1898, 


U 


<« 


Drew, Bessie L., . 


Atlantic, . 




1899-1900, 


5 


i< 


Duncan 


, Lillian G., ' 


Monson, . 




. 1900, 


2 


" 


Dwyer, 


Anna M., . 


Leyden, . 




. 1898, 


15 


n 


Dyer, Ethel T., . 


Truro, 




... 1898, 


i£ 


a 


Edgerton, M. Lillian, . 


Bennington, Vt., 




. 1900, 


15 


<« 


Ekman, 


Anna S., . 


Woburn, . 




. 1900, 


1 


term. 


Ela, Clara L., 


Hudson, . 




. 1898, 


9 


years. 


Elland, 


Mary, 


East Dennis, 




. 1899, 


4 


" 


Emerson, Winifred, 


Reading, . 




1898-1899, 


11 


11 


English 


Margaret, 


Wareham, 




1899-1900, 


9 


c< 


Evans, Carrie M., . 


Merrimac, 




. 1899, 


22 


(( 


Fearing 


Eliza C, . 


South Wareham, 




. 1900, 


1 


term. 


Fisher, 


Lizzie M., . 


Norwood, . 




. 1898, 


1 


year. 


Fleming 


, HuldaS., 


Gill, .... 




. 1900, 


1 


< t 


Flint, Alice W., . 


Brandon, Vt., . 




1898-1899, 


12 


years. 


French, 


L. Pearl, . 


Kingston, N. H., 




. 1899, 


4 


< < 


Gibbs, Bessie B , . 


Middleborough, 




. 


1898, 


3 


<< 



34 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Session. 


Experience. 


Gibbs, Sara F., 


. Pocasset, . 




1898, 


10 


years. 


Gifford, Gertrude, . 


. Plymouth, 




. 


1898, 


4 


" 


Gilraan, Maude E., 


. Arlington, 




. 1899 


-1900, 


6 


<« 


Goodale, Ethel M., 


. Brattleborough 


Vt., 


. 


1899, 


1 


year. 


Goodwin, Clara G., 


. Orleans, . 




. 


1898, 


12 


years. 


Gould, Ella A., 


. West Newton, 






1898, 


1 


year. 


Grady, Ella M., . 


. Sandwich, 






1899, 


3 


years. 


Grady, M. Alice, . 


. Fall River, 






1899, 


11 


it 


Greene, Vianna C, 


. Clinton, . 




. 1898 


-1899, 


21 


« 


Guyer, Lottie J., . 


. Hyannis, . 






1900, 


1 


year. 


Halladay, Edna J., 


. Watertown, 






1900, 


1ft 


years. 


Hallett, S. W., 


. Ware, 




. 1899 


-1900, 


20 


" 


Hammond, Hannah G. 


, . Chatham, . 




. 1899 


-1900, 


2 


Cl 


Hancock, Mabel D., 


. Barre, 




. 


1899, 


6 


tt 


Hapgood, Ida A., . 


. South Acton, 






1898, 


5 


<t 


Hardy, Eva A., 


. Andover, . 






1900, 


6 


" 


Hardy, Grace F., . 


. Chatham, . 






1900, 


6 


tt 


Harlow, Laura C, . 


. Santuit, 






1899, 


_ 




Harris, Eliza L., 


. Barnstable, 






1900, 


_ 




Hartwell, Ida A., . 


. South Lancaste 


r, 


. 


1899, 


2 


a 


Hastings, Mattie L., 


. North Orange, 




1898 


-1899, 


3 


.« 


Hawkes, Henrietta, 


. Saugus, 




. 


1899, 


2 


i( 


Heckmann, Jennie L., 


. Plainville, 




. 1898 


-1899, 


5 


tt 


Herriott, Adelaide S., 


. Medford, . 






1900, 


21 


^ 


Heywood, Helen, . 


. Fall River, 






1900, 


1 


year. 


Hinckley, C. Hervey, 


. Sandwich, 




. 


1899, 


2 


terms. 


Hinckley, Florence B. 


. Hyannis, . 






1900, 


_ 




Holbrook, Sarah F., 


. Norfolk, . 




, 


1900, 


3 


years. 


Hopkins, Addie F., 


. East Brewster, . 181 


)8-1899 


-1900, 


3 


tt 


Horton, Lula B., . 


. Brattleborough, Vt., 




1899, 


2 


<( 


Hosmer, Mary A , . 


. Billerica, . 


1899- 


-1900, 


2 


(i 


Howe, Edith, . 


. Wollaston, 




1898, 


_ 




Howe, Eva M., 


. Rowley, 




1900, 


2 


years. 


Howes, Dora P., . 


. Holyoke, . 




1900, 


6 


i i 


Howes, Martha W., 


. Yarmouth, 


1898 


-1899, 


11 


u 


Howland, Elizabeth T. 


. South Dartmouth, 




1898, 


2 


u 


Hulbert, Gertrude I., 


. Cambridge, 


. 


1899, 


2 


t< 


Hunt, Inez A., 


. Melrose, . 




1900, 


10 


1 1 


Jacobs, Pearl L., . 


. Franklin, . 




1899, 


2 


<( 


Jones, Amy W., 


. Medford, . 


. 


1900, 


18 


tt 


Keefe, Katharine, . 


. No. Bennington, Vt., 


. 


1900, 


8 


tt 


Kelley, Augusta M., 


. Centreville, 


1899- 


-1900, 


1 


year. 


Kelley, Blanche, . 


. Hyannis, . 


1899- 


-1900, 


_ 




Kelley, Nellie B., . 


. Centreville, 


1898- 


-1899, 


8 


years. 


Kelly, Helen S., . 


. North Raynham, 


1898- 


-1899, 


_ 




Kerr, Selena M., . 


. Maiden, . 




1898, 


1 


year. 

tt 


Kerrigan, Fannie L., 


. Hudson, . 




. 


1898, 


1 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT IIYANNfS. 



.7.7 



Name. 


Residence. 


Session. 


Experience. 


Kerry, Alice S., 


. Blackstone, 


1898-1899, 


2 


years. 


Kimball, Alice A., . 


. North Stoughton, 


. 1898-1899, 


12 


" 


Kimball, Edwin F., 


East Milton, 


. 1899, 


18 


a 


King, John R., 


. Taunton, . 


. 1898, 


G 


1 1 


Kingman, Frederic W., 


. Hyannis, . 


. 1899-1900, 


5 


" 


Kinney, Winifred M., 


. Southbridge, 


. 1898, 


2 


" 


Knight, T. H. H., . 


. Duxbury, . 


. 1898, 


10 


" 


Knowles, Ruth M , 


. Melrose Highlands, . 


. 1900, 


8 


c( 


Lapham, Alice G., . ■ 


. Webster, . 


. 1899-1900, 


4 


(< 


Lindsey, Mabel E., 


. Marblehead, 


. 1898, 


2 


it 


Linnell, Edith A., . 


Hyannisport, 


. 1900, 


- 




Lothrop, Percy, 


. Hyannis, . . . 18£ 


>8-1899-1900, 


- 




Lovell, Ida M., 


Nantucket, 


. 1900, 


12 


" 


Macgregor, Jessie D., 


Maiden, . 


. 1898, 


2 


terms. 


Maher, Kate E., . 


. Hyannis, . . . 


. 1900, 


h 


year. 


Marchant, Agnes, . 


West Yarmouth, 


1899-1900, 


8 


years. 


Marines, Dionisio, 


. Mexico, . 


. 1900, 


2 


" 


Marshall, Bessie A., 


. Chelsea, . 


' . 1898, 


2 


" 


McCoy, Helen, 


. New Bedford, . 


. 1898, 


5 


" 


McDermott, Margaret, 


. West Hingham, 


. 1900, 


3 


« 


McDermott, Mary L., 


Biddeford, Me, 


. 1900, 


- 




McDonnell, Mary E., 


Quincy, 


. 1900, 


1 


year. 


McVeigh, Sara A., 


. Brattleborough. Vt., 


. 1899, 


3 


years. 


Miller, Florence M., 


. Leominster, 


. 1899, 


- 




Mitchell, Christina P., 


Quincy, . 


. 1900, 


1 


year. 


Montague, Jessie, . 


Holyoke, . 


1899-1900, 


11 


years. 


Mooney, Elizabeth E., 


Waltham, . 


. 1899, 


3 


" 


Mooney, Elizabeth J., 


West Brookfield, 


. 1898,. 


7 


« i 


Moore, Cora L., 


Northfleld, 


1899-1900, 


11 


" 


Morse, Adel M., . 


Hudson, . 


1898-1899, 


4 


" 


Mosher, Mary E., . 


North Dartmouth, . 


. 1899, 


6 


" 


Murdock, Lillian G., 


North Abington, 


. 1899, 


- 




Murdock, Maude E., 


North Abington, 


. 1899, 


1 


term. 


Nagle, Ina J., 


. Denver, Col., . 


. 1900, 


- 




Nelson, Willard B., 


Jamaica Plain, . 


1899-1900, 


Ik 


years. 


Newcombe, Elsie G., 


Millis, 


. 1900, 


2 


t< 


Newman, Vina G., 


Dixfield, Me., . 


. 1898, 


8 


CC 


Nichols, Clara T., . 


Holliston, . 


. 1900, 


12 


CC 


Nickerson, Agnes M., 


. Chatham, . 


1899-1900, 


2 


" 


Nolen, Mary H., . 


. New York City, 


. 1898, 


7 


CC 


Noyes, Alice L., . 


Abington,. 


. 1899, 


5 


CC 


O'Callaghan, Irene, 


Marlborough, . 


. 1899, 


5 


CC 


Packard, Alice M., 


Ashburnham, . 


. 1900, 


7 


" 


Palmer, Flore E., . 


. Westford, 


. 1900, 


- 




Parker, Jacob, 


. Plympton, 


. 1S98, 


3 


CC 


Parsons, Mary A., . 


. Conway, . 


. 1898, 


11 


CC 


Parsons, May, 


. Holden, . 


. 1900, 


14 


u 



36 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Session. 


Experience. 


Parsons, Sylvia B., 


. Conway, . 


. 1898, 


- 




Peffers, Mary A., . 


Stoneham, 


. 1898-1899, 


15 


years. 


Perkins, Anna K., . 


. East Walpole, . 


. 1898, 


1 


year. 


Perry, Frances M., 


. Bourne, . 


. 1898, 


3 


years. 


Perry, Jennie S , . 


. Westfield, 


. 1898-1899, 


9 


" 


Phillips, Eben F., . 


. South Dennis, . 


. 1900, 


2 


" 


Phinney, Alice C, . 


. Cambridge, 


. 1899, 


21 


C i 


Poole, Nellie E., . 


Clinton, . 


. 1899, 


3 


U 


Poor, Margaret S., 


. Peabody, . 


. 1898, 


11 


<< 


Price, Mabel, 


. Melrose, . 


. 1900, 


4 


a 


Price, W. H., 


. Milton, 


. 1898, 


3 


» 


Prouty, Abbie J., . 


. Guilford Centre, Vt , 


. 1898, 


5 


i i 


Putnam, Grace E., 


. Bedford, . 


. 1899-1900, 


6 


" 


Putnam, Walter L., 


. Braintree, 


. 1900, 


3 


" 


Raymond, Daisy, . 


. Beverly, . 


. 1900, 


- 




Reed, Alice C, 


. Medford, . 


. 1900, 


6 


it 


Reilly, Isabel M., . 


. Franklin, . 


. 1899-1900, 


17 


(< 


Richards, Lillian B., 


. Holyoke, . 


. 1900, 


4 


« 


Ricker, Annie L., . 


. Saugus Centre, 


. 1900, 


18 


it 


Ricker, Edith J., . 


. Cordaville, 


. 1898, 


4 


a 


Ricker, Jennie de R., 


. South Berwick, Me., 


. 1900, 


3 


t 1 


Robbins, Elsie V., . 


. Boston, 


. 1900, 


ni 


« 


Roberts, Carrie M., 


. Chelsea, . 


. 1898, 


2 


it 


Rogers, Amabel, . 


. Chatham, . 


. 1900, 


1 


year. 


Ronan, Agnes R , . 


. Revere, 


. 1899, 


3 


years. 


Rothwell, Beatrice H., 


. Quincy, . 


. 1900, 


2i 


" 


Rowell, Bertha C, 


. East Pepperell, 


. 1899, 


3 


terms. 


Ryan, Elizabeth E., 


. Belmont, . 


. 1899, 


8 


years. 


Sails, Carrie L., 


. Methuen, . 


. 1899, 


8 


a 


Sanborn, Frank E , 


. Orleans, . 


. 1898, 


10 


it 


Sanborn, Hariot C, 


. Saugus, . 


1898-1899, 


5 


a 


Scales, C. L. G., . 


. Belmont, . 


. 1898, 


19 


years. 


Scott, Dora M., 


. Jamaica Plain, . 


. 1899, 


8 


<< 


Sears, Alice F., 


. North Brewster, 


. 1899, 


3 


a 


Seyser, Abbie A., . 


. North Easton, . 


1898-1899, 


5 


a 


Shaw, Amy W., 


. Buckfield, Me., 


. 1900, 


1 


year. 


Sheridan, Bernard M, 


. Lawrence, 


. 1900, 


12 


years. 


Sherman, Florence L., 


. Barnstable, 


. 1898, 






Snow, Gertrude L., 


. Provincetown, . 


. 1899, 


3 


u 


Stacy, Chester R., . 


. West Yarmouth, 


1899-1900, 


3 


<t 


Stanwood, Idella B., 


. Brockton, 


1898-1899, 


9 


<< 


Stavert, Ella I., . 


. New Lenox, 


. 1900, 


4 


u 


Stebbins, Maud B., 


. Holyoke, . 


1898-1900, 


5 


<< 


Stevens, Adeline M., 


. Plymouth, 


. 1899, 


2 


<< 


Stevens, Edith A., . 


. Maiden, . 


. 1898, 


2 


terms. 


Stokes, Belle H., . 


. South Harwich, 


. 1898, 


2 


<< 


Stone, Mattie L., . 


Watertown, 


. 1900, 







STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT 1IYANNIS. 



37 



Name. 
Sturtevant, Edmond R., 
Swift, Caroline, 
Taylor, Ada, . 
Taylor, Irene I., . 
Tenney, A. Belle, . 
Thayer, Cassendana, 
Thomas, C. Augusta, 
Thompson, Alice G., 
Thompson, Andrina H. L. 
Thompson, Jessie E. H., 
Tillson, Wm. D., ., 
Tirrell, Lizzie E., . 
Tirrell, Stella L., . 
Tower, Grace W., . 
Vaughn, Bertha E., 
Vedder, Abbie M., 
Walsh, Julia M., . 
Ward, E Gertrude, 
Warner, Annie F., 
Warner, C. Lilian, 
Warner, Joseph DeW., . 
Warren, Lucy A., . 
Warren, Mary E , . 
Washburn, Mabel E., . 
Waterman, Hannah P., . 
Weiscopf, Caroline, 
Wheeler, E. C, . 
Whipple, Gertrude N., . 
White, Mary E., . 
Wiggin, Alice, 
Wilbar, Chester H , 
Wilbar, Nellie E., . 
Wilbur, Grace A., . 
Wilde, Lida J., 
Williams, Julia K., 
Wing, Maude E., . 
Withers, Sarah, 
Wixon, Leona M., 
Woodbury, Grace, 
Woodbury, Mary E , . 
Wyckoff, J. Ray, . 



Me. 



Residence. 
Ware, 
Lynn, 
Hudson, . 
Leominster, 
Middleborough, 
Quincy, 
Middleborough 
West Dresden, 
Brookline, 
Brookline, 
Cambridge, 
Weymouth Centre 
South Weymouth, 
Hudson, . 
Rock, 

Cottage City, 
North Easton, 
East Milton, 
Peabody, . 
New York City 
New York City 
Foxborough, 
Shirley, . 
Baldwinville, 
Centreville, 
Jamaica Plain, 
Hyannis, . 
Kingston, N 
Brookline, 
Franklin, . 
Hyannis, . 
Hyannis, . 
Plain ville, 
Somerville, 
North Egremont, 
Cataumet, 
Chester, S. C , 
North Harwich 
East Milton, 
Spencer, . 
Franklin, . 



H 



Session. 
. 1900, 
. 1898, 
. 1898, 

1898-1899, 
. 1898, 

1899-1900, 
. 1898, 
. 1900, 

1898-1900, 
. 1898, 
. 1898, 
. 1900, 
. 1898, 
. 1898, 
. 1898, 
. 1898, 

1898-1899, 
. 1899, 
. 1898, 
. 1900, 
. 1900, 
. 1899, 
. 1899, 

1899-1900, 
. 1899, 

1898-1899, 

1899-1900, 
. 1899, 
. 1898, 

1899-1900, 
1898-1899-1900, 
1898-1899-1900, 

1898-1899, 

1898-1900, 
. 1900, 

1898-1900, 
. 1900, 

1898-1899, 
. 1899, 
. 1899, 
. 1900, 



Experience. 

4 years. 
13 

3 
10 



8 terms. 

3 years. 
10 
11 

1 year. 

2 years. 
3 

2} " 

1 year. 

1 term. 



13 years. 
13 
3 

4* « 
3 

4 
17 

10 • " 
16 years. 

4 

7h " 

3 

4 

8 " 

2 
11 

6 



Situation of School. • 
The school is situated in the village of Hyannis, seventy-nine 
miles from Boston. The Cape is here only about three miles 
across, and scarcely a breeze can come to us without traversing a 



88 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

broad expanse of water. It is much as though we were on an 
island forty miles long and from three to fifteen wide. This part 
of the Cape is well wooded with pine and oak forests, abounds in 
beautiful fresh-water lakes, and its shore is indented with fine 
bays ; thus the scenery on land and water is varied and beautiful. 
The habitat of the city or inland town is delighted with the oppor- 
tunities for seeing cranberry bogs, the clam digging, the bluefish- 
ing and kindred industries. He enjoys the bathing, the boating 
and fishing. If he prefers his wheel or a horse, he will find mac- 
adamized State roads for the first, and delightful, lonely, winding- 
wood -roads for the last. 

Hyannis is on the Cape Cod division of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad. The train service throughout the 
summer season is excellent. Hyannis is rapidly becoming a well 
known summer resort, and Boston business men go back and forth 
daily on the train throughout the summer season. 

Favorite Excursions from Hyannis. 

The quaint old village of Yarmouth, only three and one-half 
miles across the Cape, is well worth a visit, and may be reached 
by train, by wheel or by carriage. 

Shoot-flying Hill, from which on a clear day the whole Cape 
and the mainland as far north as Plymouth can be seen, is only five 
miles away, and can be reached by barge. 

Wequaquet Lake is situated at the foot of Shoot-flying Hill. It 
has a much indented shore, about nine miles around, contains 
beautiful islands, and is much resorted to for fishing, boating and 
picnicking. 

These are typical of other villages, lakes and resorts which are 
within easy reach of Hyannis. 

More distant points of interest are Provincetown, at one ex- 
treme end of the Cape, the part made famous by Thoreau's "Cape 
Cod;" Buzzard's Bay, the summer home of Grover Cleveland and 
Joseph Jefferson; Wood's Holl, the seat of the noted Marine 
Biological Laboratory, and the aquarium of the United States Fish 
Commission ; Plymouth, just across Cape Cod Bay ; Nantucket, 
nearly due south across Vineyard Sound ; and Martha's Vineyard, 
to the southwest of us. Provincetown, Buzzard's Bay, Wood's 
Holl and Plymouth may be reached by rail; and one may also 



STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 39 

cross the Cape to Yarmouth, and thence sail to Provincetown and 
Plymouth. Excursions may be made by steamer directly to 
Nantucket, and by rail and steamer to Martha's Vineyard. 

Expenses. 

Tuition will be free to all who signify their intention to teach in 
the State ; to others, the nominal fee of $4 will be charged for the 
five weeks. 

Use of books and equipment of the school will be free. 

Books, paper and laboratory materials will be furnished at 
cost. * ' 

Board and furnished room, with heat and light (no personal wash- 
ing), two single beds in each room, at the dormitory, $5.50 for 
women and $5.75 for men. With only one person in a room the 
rate will be $1 higher. Board without room, $4.50. 

Other Information. 

Women are expected to care for their own rooms, unless special 
arrangements are made for the same. 

Each boarder at the dormitory is expected to bring sheets for 
single beds, pillow cases, towels, napkins, clothes-bags and nap- 
kin-ring. 

All clothing should be distinctly and indelibly marked with the 
owner's name. 

Those desiring board at the dormitory should make arrange- 
ments at once, as the motto will be, "First come first served." 

Others will be directed to places in the village on their arrival, 
and can then select such rooms as seem to them desirable. 

Teachers from about Boston should be sure and secure round- 
trip tickets at excursion rates. 

Excursion Rates. 
Round- trip tickets, good for the summer season, may be pur- 
chased at excursion rates at all places in the eastern part of the 
State. 

Special Notice. 

Many of those who attended the session of 1900 have regis- 
tered for this year. Only about as many more can be accommo- 
dated. If the number of applicants exceeds the accommodations, 
those applying first will be first considered for admission. 



40 STATE NOBMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

It seems desirable to have it understood by all who contemplate 
attending this school that it is a real school, established and sup- 
ported by the State for the professional training of those who are 
now or expect to be teachers in the State. 

It is, in fact, a State Normal School, and is administered on that 
basis. 

Students are expected to conform to such simple regulations as 
seem to the faculty desirable for the proper management of the 
school. A few regulations have been found necessary in connec- 
tion with the dormitory, so that those who desire to study evenings 
may have some quiet, uninterrupted hours for the same. 

The principal will be glad to answer any inquiries which are not 
answered in this circular. 



I 



HECKMAN IXI 
BINDERY INC. |s| 

J AN 96